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Demystifying Sourdough – Everything You’ve Ever Wanted To Know About Sourdough Starter – Why It’s Better For You – And How To Start One

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Why Should You Eat Sourdough? What’s The Difference Between Sourdough And Bread Made With Rapid Rise Yeast?

If you’ve been following along on my journey to health then you probably know that I soak, sour or sprout all the grains, nuts and legumes that I eat, usually with some sort of acid (typically whey from my raw yogurt). This soaking process does several different things. The most important being it neutralizes the naturally occurring phytic acid in these plant foods.

Phytic acid acts as an anti-nutrient, actually blocking nutrients and minerals from being absorbed in your digestive tract. In small quantities it’s not a huge problem but for many people the complex carbohydrates that are provided from grains, legumes and nuts make up a huge proportion of their diets. That’s when reducing phytic acid becomes so important! This is really becoming a health problem when we talk about “plant-based” diets. Most modern people who practice plant-based, vegetarian, or vegan diets are often consuming much higher levels of phytic acid.

When you bake with sourdough the fermentation process is long. It gives plenty of time for producing the lactic acid required for phytic acid reduction. It is for this reason that I am committed to baking with sourdough and use alternative flours like almond very sparingly.

On the other hand, rapid rise yeast consumes the sugars in the flour so quickly and without the benefit of lactic acid producing bacteria that very little reduction in phytic acid occurs. This is a major problem considering the quantity of bread foods that most of the world consumes on a daily basis.

Almost all traditional peoples knew to soak and ferment the grains, nuts and legumes they were consuming. And all bread was naturally leavened (like sourdough) up until the invention of rapid rise yeast in the 1860’s.  So for over 14,000 years of bread making, early humans were utilizing wild yeast. And over the last two centuries we have almost completely abandoned these traditional ways. If you are starting to wonder if there is a correlation between abandoning our traditional food-ways and our declining health then you are on the right track.

To learn more about traditional peoples, what real traditional foods they ate, and why they had superior health please read Sally Fallon-Morell’s new book Nourishing Diets: How Paleo, Ancestral and Traditional Peoples Really Ate.

The sourdough fermentation process also breaks down gluten protein making it much easier to digest!

Many people with gluten sensitivities are able to enjoy traditionally fermented sourdough bread! The longer the bread ferments, the more gluten protein is broken down. Real sourdough bread can be fermented for 12, 24, 36 and even up to 48 hours!

 

A bubbly jar of fermented sourdough starter, perfect for baking artisan style breads.

 

Page Guide

Page 1. Intro
Page 2. What Is Sourdough?
Page 3. Bread Terminology
Page 4. Why Eat Sourdough?
Page 5. Tools
Page 6. Starter Recipe
Page 7. Fresh Starter vs. Discard
Page 8. Starter Hydration & Feeding
Page 9. Favorite Recipes
Page 10. Troubleshooting Sourdough
Page 11.  Starter Insurance Policy
Page 12. Using Stale Bread
Page 13. Recipes You Don’t Want To Miss
 
Once you try this easy sourdough pie crust you will never go back. Fermented grains and real butter make this recipe a nourishing tradition.
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Sweet And Buttery Sourdough Pie Crust - Traditionally Fermented For A Nourished Diet
Freshly fired, golden brown and crispy Parmesan and sourdough crusted chicken strips.
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Parmesan And Sourdough Crusted Chicken Strips - Fried in Traditional Fat

Lina Herzer

Monday 3rd of August 2020

Hello, what a perfect site about sourdough! I am mainly interested in making the crackers for now. When I create the starter, can the discard from day 1 and onwards be saved in the fridge until I have enough to make a tray of crackers? or do I have to wait until day 14, discard? So on day three I would have 300grams of discard collected.Hope that makes sense. Thank you!

Butter For All

Monday 3rd of August 2020

Hi Lina!

It makes perfect sense. I usually recommend people start saving discard after around day 7, if and only if there is some significant growth and activity. You don't want to be keeping and using the starter before it's balanced correctly. It just won't taste good, especially if it's very sour, which is typical in the beginning until you cultivate the yeast!Get your starter going first, then when it starts doubling regularly it will be ready to use in all the recipes!

Hope that helps!

Courtney

Ed

Sunday 26th of July 2020

Hi what's the difference between using brewer's yeast, or Fleischman yeast as against preparing the sourdough starter?

Athena Engel

Thursday 23rd of July 2020

I love your revamped site!! It’s so clean and fresh!! I have a question about my starter. I was given a 50% starter. I absolutely love it!! It is so relaxing to knead it while feeding, it’s easy to work with, I can let it sit in my fridge and rise so it doesn’t die in my hot home (90-95 degrees) and isn’t nearly as messy. I have one HUGE problem, however. I cannot find recipes that use it. Is there a way to use my starter in your recipes? All of yours look so darn good, I would really like to make them.

Monika

Thursday 9th of July 2020

Please help me my sourdough bread always comes out sour . i did float test . how can i get no sour sourdough bread . Thanks

Butter For All

Saturday 11th of July 2020

Hi Monika,

You need to work on your starter. Feed it every 12 hours to help balance the bacteria to yeast. A bacteria heavy starter will be more sour. You want to encourage the yeast by feeding it more often. Watch this video where I explain how this works - https://youtu.be/M2w1f5sjAvc

Hope it helps,

Courtney

Beth

Thursday 9th of July 2020

Hi thank you for sharing. Is there anyway to print all the pages in one document without cutting and pasting?

Butter For All

Saturday 11th of July 2020

Hi Beth,

I don't have this available to print at this time. But I may create a PDF in the future since I've had a lot of requests! Get on my mailing list and I'll make sure you get notified when it becomes available. Thanks for the feedback!

Courtney

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