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How To Make Thick Coconut Yogurt and Keep a Continuous Culture Thriving

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You are going to see a lot of new recipes featuring this rich and creamy coconut yogurt.

A collage of bowls of creamy coconut yogurt with text overlay.

I just can’t seem to get enough of this tangy, thick, fermented coconut yogurt. It is full of healthy satiating fats and great gut-friendly probiotics, plus it is completely dairy free! I love my raw cow’s milk yogurt but having a second creamy fermented yogurt is a lot of fun to work into new and exciting recipes. It’s also extremely easy to keep a continuous culture going so you will always have coconut yogurt on hand.

A bowl full of rich and creamy coconut yogurt.

Making Coconut Yogurt With Capsule Probiotics

I’ve tried the capsulated probiotic method for making coconut yogurt and never had great success. The yogurt was always runny and never got the effervescence of the store-bought coconut yogurts.

So inevitably I was buying the expensive, tangy, beautiful little glass jars of sparkly cultured coconut yogurt from the health food store.

and then it hit me…

I decided to try using the store-bought coconut yogurt as a starter. I have had great success using store-bought yogurt to culture raw milk so why not coconut milk!

A close look at the thick and creamy texture of this fermented coconut yogurt.

Using and Maintaining a Strong Culture

I chose my favorite brand of coconut yogurt (the one with the greatest fermented fizz) and added 2 tablespoons to 2 cans of organic guar gum-free coconut milk. I mixed it well and let it ferment overnight on the counter with a loosely fitted lid. The next morning I stirred the cultured coconut milk until it was smooth and placed it in the refrigerator where it continued to ferment and thicken. After about 24 hours the yogurt has visible bubbles and had the pleasing effervescence that I was looking for!

I ate that jar of coconut yogurt pretty quickly over the next few days. Before I had eaten it all, I started a new batch the same way I had started the original. The next batch fermented just as well as the first and so did the next few batches after that one. I have no idea how long the continuous starter will last but if it ever fails or wanes in effectiveness I will update you on when and why (if I know).

Try These Recipes That Use Coconut Yogurt

Creamy Coconut Cauliflower Curry Soup

Two steaming bowls of super creamy Coconut Cauliflower Curry Soup. #keto #lowcarb #dairyfree #nourishing #realfood

Probiotic Coconut Mango Lassi Popsicles

A colorful plate of mango lassi popsicles.

A bowl full of rich and creamy coconut yogurt is a great source of gut friendly probiotics and healthy fats!

Thick Coconut Yogurt

Yield: 1 Quart
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Fermenting Time: 2 days
Total Time: 2 days 5 minutes

This super culture will be the mother to many batches of thick, creamy, healthy, probiotic coconut yogurt.

Ingredients

  • 2 cans (13.5 ounces each) organic coconut milk (guar gum free)
  • 2 tablespoons coconut yogurt (either store bought or prevous batch)

Instructions

  1. Mix the coconut milk and coconut yogurt in a quart-sized jar.
  2. Add a loose-fitting lid and ferment at room temperature overnight.
  3. Stir the yogurt well and refrigerate the jar for at least 24 hours.
  4. Eat the yogurt in smoothies, with fruit, as a topping or dressing, and more.
  5. Remember to save 2 tablespoons to start your next batch!

Notes

There may be a tiny bit of separation at the bottom of the jar. This is normal and you can use the liquid portion in smoothies or just stir it back in. 

A bowl of creamy coconut yogurt with text overlay.

Jordan

Monday 19th of February 2024

I tried this recipe and 2 days later my yogurt is still super runny :( I’m not sure what I did wrong.

Butter For All

Tuesday 20th of February 2024

Hi Jordan, You might need to add a little more heat to get things to firm up. Try filling your sink with warm water and submerging the jars up to the rim for several hours. If they still haven't set up, repeat this process. Let me know how it works out! Thanks for stopping by, Courtney

noel

Wednesday 6th of December 2023

i noticed the cocojune brand uses cassava root (maybe as a thickener?) So i was thinking about experimenting with that or maybe getting some pure coconut flour and adding it to coconut milk to see if it would turn out. What didnt work for me was using coconut milk from a carton. i dont think cartoned silk coconut milk contains enough fats for the enzymes, or maybe because it has additives... i tried canned coconut + 2 tablespoons of coconut yogurt from store as starter and it worked, but the canned coconut has a weird taste to me, and the fermentation process didnt change the taste much. think the best way might be using fresh coconut meat blended into a slurry, so thats what i'm going to try next. I suspect thats how the Cocoyo brand makes theirs and that stuff is addictive with some pomegranate mixed in.

Butter For All

Tuesday 12th of December 2023

Hi Noel,

I like the way you think. Experimental cooking is so much fun. Please come back and lets us know the results of your efforts!

Billie

Tuesday 14th of November 2023

Let me start by saying I have milk allergy and my house is always cold and the oven will not go above 70 with light bulb on. I can make yogurt in the bathroom by closing door and turning up heat. This is expensive. So, I am thinking of buying a yogurt maker. Is there any reason an automatic yogurt make will not work since the coconut yogurt is the same as for cow's milk yogurt recipe?? (On of the makers give recipe for soy yogurt, but no other uncommon milk.) Thanks.

Butter For All

Tuesday 12th of December 2023

Hi Billie,

I get it a cold house can really hinder fermentation! I don't see any reason why a yogurt maker isn't a great solution for you. It may take a little playing around with to figure out the right time and temperature but I'm sure that it can be done successfully!

Robin Stickney

Saturday 11th of November 2023

I have been making the l Reuteri coconut yogurt in Super Gut, which is the only coconut yogurt I’ve ever made. The instructions for this yogurt (from several sources) is to first pasteurize the coconut milk to keep from having unwanted bacteria proliferate, and to add a small amount of sugar and inulin to feed the probiotics so they can grow. I’m wondering why that isn’t necessary with this method?

Butter For All

Tuesday 12th of December 2023

Hi Robin, I'm not familiar with that method, but because I used canned coconut milk, I see no need to pasteurize. Also, if you have a strong culture, you shouldn't have any problem with unwanted bacteria as lactic acid from fermentation keeps other bacterias in check.

Terry

Friday 27th of October 2023

Is coconut yogurt really supposed to be fizzy? That sounds weird and off-putting to me. I'm planning to go dairy-free for a while and rely on coconut for some of the replacements, so I hope this ends up being doable. I've also been making raw milk yogurt for years now and wondered like the other post-er if I could just use a couple of tablespoons of that as my starter - or are the flora involved completely different?

Butter For All

Sunday 5th of November 2023

Hey Terry,

It can get fizzy, even store-bought coconut yogurt can have that effervescence from fermentation. I can't advise you about using your yogurt to start, I've never tried it, but I personally feel like the combination might be funky. You'll have to let me know if it works for you!

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