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Sourdough Honey Buns – The Perfect Dinner Roll

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Soft, Sweet and Sharable Sourdough Honey Buns

 

Not you typical dinner roll!
These soft, sweet and shareable Sourdough Honey Buns are the perfect compliment to any meal.

They are made with wholesome real-food ingredients and they are traditionally fermented and leavened using active sourdough starter.

 

 

Soft, Sweet and Sharable Sourdough Honey Buns

 

Fermented grains are easier to digest, have better nutrition and taste really dang good. Serve them alongside a soup or stew, with your holiday meals or have one warm with butter and jam!

 

Try my cinnamon version of these Honey Buns too!

Cinnamon Sourdough Honey Buns

Cinnamon Sourdough Honey Buns

Soft, Sweet and Sharable Sourdough Honey Buns

Sourdough Honey Buns

Yield: 16
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Fermenting Time: 11 hours 49 minutes
Total Time: 12 hours 49 minutes

Perfectly sweet sourdough rolls made with real honey and traditional fermentation. 

Instructions

The night before:

  1. Mix the sourdough bun ingredients together either by hand or in a stand mixer. Knead the dough in the bowl until it’s smooth and supple. It will be fairly sticky. Cover the bowl and let the dough rest overnight at room temperature.

The next morning:

  1. Flour your work surface and turn the dough out onto it. Shape the dough into a long narrow log. Cut the dough into 16 equal portions. Shape each portion into a tight round ball. For directions on shaping dough see my Sourdough Burger Buns recipe for instructions.
  2. Melt 4 tablespoons of butter in a baking dish, 12''casserole pan or cast iron pan. Place the buns top down in the butter before turning them over to seam side down and spacing them evenly. Allow them to proof until they have doubled in size.
  3. Preheat your oven to 375°. Bake the buns for 30 minutes. Let them cool in the pan for at least 30 minutes before serving.

 

 

 

 

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Marli

Wednesday 12th of August 2020

Hi there! This recipe looks wonderful and DELICIOUS! I just have a few questions: I made this recipe a few times now, and wanted to know whether or not the dough should be rising during the overnight rest. My dough is exactly the same size the next morning, and develops a hard crust on the outside. It's also quite hard to handle. My house is nice and warm 24/7, so I don't think that should be a problem. Could it be that my dough isn't moist enough? I've tried to keep it as moist as I could, except that I can't knead it when it's so moist. Also, how should I proof it? How long should it proof before it goes into the oven? My buns don't rise, so I'm wondering if I'm not letting them rise/proof long enough. I proof them by putting them in a warm oven (80 degrees Celsius) covered in aluminium foil for about an hour and then let them bake. The dough is very heavy. How long would you suggest I proof them in the morning? And how? My sourdough starter seems very happy, so I don't think that's the problem either. Thanks so much.

Marli

Thursday 13th of August 2020

Thanks so much for the quick reply Courtney! Hmmm, that does sound very strange to me as well. I could probably try an alternative sweetner, only I'm not sure whether I'll be able to source the amount I need where I am. Do you think if I make the dough nice and moist it might help, even if I don't knead it? Perhaps something is wrong with the starter. This will probably sounds really weird but do you think that I might not even be feeding a real sourdough starter? It's all bubbly after feeding, and does devolop a small amount of hooch just before the next feeding. I usually pour that off and just feed it normaly. It doesn't smell like ''nothing'' so to speak. It smells pretty ''strong''. I haven't noticed that the actual starter doubles in size after a feeding. I have baked other sourdough bread with it before, and they rose just fine. Thanks so much for all the help! Marli

Butter For All

Wednesday 12th of August 2020

Hi Marli,

Thanks for taking the time to thoroughly explain what is happening. The dough should be rising overnight. If it's not rising at all there is something very off. There have been rare instances when a certain strain/strength of yeast does not ferment well with honey in the dough. In some cases the honey actually inhibits fermentation completely. That is what it sounds like to me. But it is very unusual. Is there an alternative sweetener you could try? Maple Syrup or coconut sugar are two that come to mind for me.

The dough should behave like any other yeast bread. It should double before baking. If the dough is not doubling then the yeast is not working. You say your starter is happy, that's great! How long does it take to double after a feeding?

Hope I can continue to help!

Courtney

Alex

Monday 10th of August 2020

I've made this recipe countless times at this point. It turns out great every time. Lately it's been so warm in my house - around 30 deg Celsius or 86 deg Fahrenheit - that I have to put my overnight rise in the fridge. But they still rise and taste wonderful.

Yesterday I tried an altered version for the first time: I omitted the honey, used sour milk instead of whole milk, used 50 g of olive oil instead of the butter, used spelt flour instead of whole wheat flour, and added a bunch (maybe two tablespoons) of fresh rosemary. I ended up portioning out 12 buns instead of 16 as I wanted to make mini-sandwiches with these. They are fantastic with a pleasant rosemary aroma.

Thank you for the great recipe!

Butter For All

Wednesday 12th of August 2020

Oh wow, Alex!

Awesome! That alteration sounds amazing! I can't wait to try it!!! Thanks for leaving your feedback, and the kind words :)

Courtney

Rio

Thursday 4th of June 2020

Hi, I’m a newbie. Is the dough left out for the night( how many hours) to increase fermentation? If it doubles in size in 4 hours is that acceptable?

Butter For All

Sunday 7th of June 2020

Hi Rio,

I personally like a long ferment to break down the hard to digest proteins, but since all starters are unique you really need to pay attention to your own dough. So yes, at least double for the first proof is sufficient! You are exactly right!

Happy Baking,

Courtney

Daphnee Kelly

Thursday 23rd of April 2020

Hello,

Thank you for this recipe. This is my first time making a sourdough starter and bread. I’m looking forward to making this recipe. Do you have a video that I can follow? Also, what do you mean by, “ Place the buns top down in the butter before turning them over to seam side down?” I’m not sure I understand. What’s top down? Is that for buns only? Once I add the butter, do I add the dough balls & let sit at room temperature covered until it rises? About how long until it rises? Thank you.

Butter For All

Thursday 23rd of April 2020

Hi Daphnee,

I don't have a video for this recipe, yet!

For your first Q, You just want to get each side buttered, so you dip the top in the melted butter before placing the buns seam side down.

Yes, you want to proof them at room temperature until double. The time it takes will depend on how strong your starter is, but usually 2-6 hours to double.

Hope that helps,

Courtney

Jenny

Friday 10th of April 2020

Thank you so much for this recipe. I had a starter I hadn't used in a while and didn't want to discard, so I've been baking at every feeding. I love that these rolls have an overnight rise because it means I can make them without a lot of fuss. Truth be told, I forgot about them and the first proof went almost 18 hours. But the dough was very forgiving and they still worked out great.

I love sourdough bread, and love the taste and texture of these rolls, especially the slight crunch of the outer edges and bottom where it has crisped up from the butter on the skillet. This recipe was simple and so, so delicious!

Butter For All

Friday 10th of April 2020

Hi Jenny!

What a wonderful note, thanks for the feedback! Almost all my recipes have an overnight ferment for that very reason. I also love how forgiving sourdough is, once your starter is happy, it is so versatile. I'm so happy you love these rolls!!!

Happy Baking,

Courtney

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